Other Ten Percent 5/7/13

May 07 2013

I was going to do a big longform thing today and the tab I wanted to discuss is still open but I just didn’t have the energy to do a 1500 word treatise on some random ass thing and it was also an extension of the Iron Man 3 things I said yesterday so maybe a small break first was in order anyway. WHO KNOWS? Point is at any time if I dn’t have enough links you can expect me to start ranting about a thing. That’s basically the story of knowing me though.
Star Wars Infomercials, A Parody by Gamer Chick’s Milynn Sarley
I am kinda shocked when I see a Star Wars joke that actually makes me laugh these days. It’s got all the difficulty of jokes that have been done to death AND all the difficulty of jokes where the urge to make an easy cultural reference instead of actually saying something is done to death.
via Laughing Squid http://laughingsquid.com
May 06, 2013 at 09:17AM
– – – – –
Google Glass: an intriging prototype
The reviews are in and everybody basically thinks whatever their avowed position on Google Glass was already based on a $1500 prototype that wasn’t meant for consumers. I find this article interesting because it’s really reviewing the theoretical Google Glass that could come out in 2-3 years which is what everybody is actually waiting for anyway.
via kottke.org http://kottke.org/
May 06, 2013 at 09:32AM
– – – – –
The doctor prescribes Brian Eno
I kinda wish Sterling had universalized his bit a bit more here. I read quite a few glowing odes to the brilliance of late 70s Eno lately that theorized that we need to be more like him and I’m kind of in total agreement that in terms of the amount of Eno in my life “Personally, I’ve got tons. I’ve got like, emergency-prepper amounts of freeze-dried, stockpiled Brian Eno.” Everybody does in fact because when life gives you some extra Eno why wouldn’t you take it? Still, there’s a decent argument to be made that the problem with the modern music scene is that we’ve got a generation of people desperate to be Brian Eno without the the cultural context that made Brian Eno interesting. I could use a few less intellectually-oriented cultural scavengers looking to make experimental ambient projects with a world music bent right now. The only one I really like doing that schtick is Diplo and that’s because he screams it in your face just to screw with you and I admire how thoroughly un-Eno like that is in presentation. It’s becoming positively quotidian in comparison to expertly crafted formulaic pop music and people are actually allowed to like that stuff lately. This has nothing to do with Eno’s latest project by the way which seems like a pleasingly well crafted experiment in adding enough spectacle to generative art that people finally get the point.
via Beyond The Beyond http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond
May 05, 2013 at 11:44PM
– – – – –
The 2040s: flying cars, household robots, nanofactories
Sterling’s actually kind of on a smart ass roll here today. To be fair though I don’t think I’ve seen a piece of futurism so devoted to making their own retro-futuristic fetishes a thing though.
via Beyond The Beyond http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond
May 06, 2013 at 12:40AM
– – – – –
When hairdryers looked like mind-control devices
We can all agree that this is one area where advances in technology have totally failed us right? You want to get (paradoxically) cutting-edge atemporal? You should track one of these things down and get your hair did in one of these contraptions.
via Boing Boing http://boingboing.net
May 06, 2013 at 06:23AM
– – – – –
More than half of the world’s population lives inside this circle
I can’t decide if the question is what the people outside the circle are doing wrong or what the people inside the circle are doing wrong. And I think I maybe just found the most efficient description of the current geo-political landscape with that first sentence.
via io9 http://io9.com
May 06, 2013 at 06:40AM
– – – – –
Architecture Fiction: Urban drones, bacteria and 3DPrinters
“Urban Drones, Bacteria and 3D Printers” are the new “flying cars, household robots and nano-manufacturing.” I look forward to wizened, bitter, bespectacled Cory Doctorow explaining how expecting these things to finally have a breakthrough and save us all is folly in the late 2040s.
via Beyond The Beyond http://www.wired.com/beyond_the_beyond
May 05, 2013 at 11:08PM
– – – – –
Defense Distributed’s 3D Printed Handgun
So…what’s this guy’s endgame? I’ll freely admit that the logic of gun rights advocates might as well be written in some bizarre moon language as far as my liberal/socialist/hippie sensibilities are concerned but I also kinda think of myself as an outcomes focused guy and I see no outcome from shoving 3D printed weapons that can kill somebody in everybody’s faces except increased regulation for the vaguely inevitable thing this guy seems so hellbent on making happen. You can tell regulation’s pretty much inevitable from the way that 3D printing experts keep explaining in great detail how silly that would be and how we shouldn’t do it. Not that they’re wrong (there are way easier ways to get a cheap/anonymous gun than buying a Makerbot and hoping this thing doesn’t misfire and blow off your hand) but the whiff of desperation in their arguments means I leave every article like this with the distinct image of a bipartisan commission of Senators (It’s always Chuck Schumer and John McCain shaking hands in my head) making 3D printing a weapon illegal and these Defense Distributed guys feeling really pleased with themselves.
via Fabbaloo Blog http://fabbaloo.com/blog/
May 06, 2013 at 10:00AM
– – – – –
The first splatter movies were live on stage a hundred years ago [NSFW]
If the future of network television is going back to the three camera sitcom (and it is) then this is how you do a post Cabin in the Woods horror movie. Cabin in the Woods is on Netflix instant now by the way if you haven’t seen last year’s best movie yet.
via io9 http://io9.com
May 06, 2013 at 10:42AM
– – – – –
Bee deaths and historical context
Bees have been dying in huge numbers forever and that is simultaneously really comforting and even creepier because we still don’t really know why.
via Boing Boing http://boingboing.net
May 06, 2013 at 12:09PM
– – – – –

No responses yet

Leave a Reply