Other Ten Percent 4/17/13

Apr 17 2013

So I’d kind of forgotten that coding takes time even when you have all of the other content and even basically have the code you’re going to be using on hand. Just swapping back and forth between creating content and wrapping it in decent code takes time/mental energy and attempting to do all of it in one day probably wasn’t going to work if I didn’t end up getting interupted every hour and a half today. What I’m saying is that my coding project isn’t ready yet and probably won’t be till Monday. What does that mean for you, the reader? It means MORE AND BETTER content. That applies to the secret project which I should now have some time to “play test” and really iron out the presentation on and it applies to today’s OTP which is going to be kinda long because I feel guilty for not doing the thing I wanted to do today.
The Man That Found A Dog That Loved Pudding
The most in-depth examination of the hidden depths of a bizarre local crime story that you will see today and also, maybe, that you will see ever. It goes from what looks like a cheap/easy joke about how there’s nothing to do in small towns into ACTUALLY GOOGLING THE SMALL TOWN and figuring out that actually there’s a whole lot to do and woah let’s just really walk through the kind of day you have that ends with coming home and finding a strange man feeding your dog pudding because he meant to kill your neighbor and then having your dog PREFER THAT GUY.
via The Hairpin http://thehairpin.com/
April 15, 2013 at 08:00AM
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12 million Americans believe lizard people run the USA
Okay, so this has been making the rounds all month. I first saw it on Bill O’Reilly when we were picking up the rent car in Texas and here’s what bothers me about this: why are we bothering with the really small number of people who readily agree with these things? Yes. I get it. Even 4% of Americans being batshit translates to millions of people but you can get 4% of people to agree to just about anything with a small enough sample size. Most of these are just barely out of the margin of error. Am I the only person more bothered by the consistent 10-20% of people who, when asked about Lizardmen, and Paul is Dead, and Kubrick faking the moon landing, ARE UNDECIDED. Who needs more information on this? Like maybe, MAYBE the Kennedy Assassination a “no conclusion from given information” would be acceptable, but who is like “boy I’m just going to need to do a bit more reading before I can conclusively rule out that there’s a secret cabal of dinosaur people that live in the center of the Earth and run the world governments through control of the financial sector?”
via Boing Boing http://boingboing.net
April 15, 2013 at 10:32AM
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The ’80s: The Decade That Made Us, A National Geographic Miniseries Narrated by Rob Lowe
You know I hadn’t realized this was the angle we were going to take when we inevitably got around to remaking the “I love the…” shows, prestige format with some West Wing level dramatic voiceover is the obvious solution though. Now that we’ve mined it for all the wacky fun nostalgia and shoulder-pad jokes we can manage it’s time to take a long hard look at the 80s as a formative decade. I think I’m going to just keep watching The Americans personally though.
via Laughing Squid http://laughingsquid.com
April 15, 2013 at 09:17AM
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Supercut of Will Ferrell Yelling in Movies
Like that Aaron Sorkin video that came out around the time Newsroom premiered that strung together all the bits he’s ever re-used this video SHOULD make me really sick of Will Ferell’s schtick. It should make me feel like he’s kind of a hack and just does the one joke and yet, instead, I come out with this odd sort of respect to the nuance the guy manages to find in doing, essentially, the same exact joke over and over again in 20 different movies.
via Laughing Squid http://laughingsquid.com
April 16, 2013 at 09:03AM
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Alison Brie Imitates Internet Memes & Creates Unsexy Animated GIFs
Leave it to Paul F. Thompkins to properly make fun of all the weird sexy baby stuff going on around Alison Brie in internet culture. The first video where she imitates memes is pretty entertaining but the second, where she really commits to her attempts to make incredibly unsexy GIFs and then comes out of the bit to consider that there’s probably still some sicko that’ll be really into that one, is downright sublime. If you enjoy either of these I can also heartily recommend the full 22 minute interview between the two of them where you learn that Nathan Fillion apparently just wanders onto Community’s set whenever he’s bored filming Castle (hey Jenny Blackman!) and the anecdote just gets more adorable from there.
via Laughing Squid http://laughingsquid.com
April 16, 2013 at 07:58AM
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Foursquare Checkin Visualization Make Infographics Out of a Year’s Worth of Your Checkins
I sometimes wonder if I would like Foursquare better if it weren’t a mobile thing. Like is it a format problem? Because in theory I have no problem with constantly giving my location data to a large corporation (spoiler alert: I go for burgers or specialty cocktails a lot and spend too much time at home) if I’m getting something for it but Foursquare’s wrapper, where it’s all this wacky gamification version of actually having a social life, bugs me. They’re clearly capable of coming up with wrappers that don’t bug me though, this thing interests me and whenever I hear one of their employees talk I tend to like it so I really do wonder if it’s just that I’m playing their game on a phone or something.
via Laughing Squid http://laughingsquid.com
April 16, 2013 at 11:44AM
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How the face changes with shifting light sources
Man as a visual bit this is amazing but as a teaser it’s a terrible idea because I cannot imagine that the music video is going to be more entertaining than this. I’d have been down with a teaser that just showed off how they built the weird custom lighting rig I’m assuming this thing runs on that spins the light around.
via Boing Boing http://boingboing.net
April 16, 2013 at 11:49AM
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The blogging family tree
Everybody who created the modern internet knew each other in 1998 and anybody that didn’t know each other sure as hell did when Google bought them all in 2003. I appreciate Wired for giving an infographic that basically doubles as the single most concise history of the last 15 years of internet history that I can possibly imagine. Some people dated and had blogs and then Twitter showed up. The end.
via Boing Boing http://boingboing.net
April 16, 2013 at 12:04PM
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Okay I know I JUST had my nervous breakdown where I made fun of myself for talking about projection mapping so much but who wants to ACTUALLY GO SEE PROJECTION MAPPING IN THE REAL WORLD…Too bad unless you’re in SF. They’re opening a new Exploratorium this week and that’s great if you’re a fan of interactive science museums for kids (we’re all fans of that here right?) but it’s even better if you like projection mapping because on Wednesday and Thursday night this week they’re going to be projection mapping the front of Pier 15 (the new exploratorium building) and they released this cool making of video that shows how they got all the sample mapping done.
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Hey so, Todd VanDerWerff wants to tell you how we can save network TV (don’t worry, he tells you why we’d bother first) and I think he’s totally right. I think he’s so totally right that I’m kind of desperate to do this idea I’ve been kicking around for months on how you bring back the 3 camera sitcom and make a shit ton of money doing it. Here, I’ll tell you the plan in extensive detail and then you can steal it and accomplish it before me and become rich and famous while I become a bitter man who drinks and considers what might have been. First, you get yourself a theater space big enough to have a living room set that can handle a three camera set-up between it and the audience. Then you charge people admission for the traditional I Love Lucy set-up of some brief patter from a comedian followed by two performances of the episode that the producers can then use to make the final cut, and then some patter/Q&A with the performers afterward. The exact formula is up for debate but the point is you charge people $5 to come for two hours to see the live recording of this show. That money doesn’t make you any real cash it just offsets the cost of production and builds an audience for the show. You then put this up on the web as a direct to web show on your own domain or whatever video streaming site eventually wants to pay you Yahoo/Microsoft style for some original content if you get lucky. What actually makes this work is that you do it a lot. You do it weekly. You do it weekly for WAY more than 22 weeks a year. And you do that because what you’re filming is actually a sitcom anthology show. It’s called The Couch and the high concept is that it’s basically the same set every time for wildly different sitcom sub-genres in wildly different time periods because this same couch has been used in forgotten sitcoms for almost 60 years now. One week the show is a husband/wife comedy show in the vein of I Love Lucy, the next it’s a 90s/00s stoner/roommate sitcom. So, instead of trying to rehearse and direct and produce a new sitcom episode every week you’re rotating between cast members/directors such that everybody has more like a month to get their 22 minutes ready which isn’t an insane rehearsal schedule so nobody has to quit their day job to do this (except the writer/producer). Essentially you’ve got a formula for a show that people are making in their extra time that would pump out a season and a half’s worth of TV episodes on the cheap. TAH DAH.
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